The Impact of Perceived Self-Control Over Treatment Access, Appraisal of Consequences of Substance Use, Self-Reliant Attitude Against Help-Seeking and Perception of Workplace Culture on the Behavioral Intention to Seek Treatment for Substance Abuse Among Union Construction Workers

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The Impact of Perceived Self-Control Over Treatment Access, Appraisal of Consequences of Substance Use, Self-Reliant Attitude Against Help-Seeking and Perception of Workplace Culture on the Behavioral Intention to Seek Treatment for Substance Abuse Among Union Construction Workers

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dc.contributor.advisor Early, Barbara P. en_US
dc.contributor.author Grear, Karen Lynne en_US
dc.contributor.other Shields, Joseph J. en_US
dc.contributor.other Raber, Marie J. en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-24T17:11:57Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-24T17:11:57Z
dc.date.created 2011 en_US
dc.date.issued 2011-06-24T17:11:57Z
dc.identifier.other Grear_cua_0043A_10233 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1961/9723
dc.description Degree awarded: Ph.D. Social Work. The Catholic University of America en_US
dc.description.abstract More than 95 percent of adults who suffer from substance use disorders fail to connect either with professional treatment services or support groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) (McCoy, C.B., Metsch, L.R., Chitwood, D.D., & Miles, C., 2001; Tighe & Saxe, 2006). When compared to any other occupation, adult construction workers (including union members) demonstrate among the highest heavy alcohol and illicit drug use (Office of Applied Studies, 2007; Popp & Swora, 2001). Research indicates a variety of psychological and environmental barriers likely impede treatment access (Clay, 2007). Less understood is the role of individual attitudes towards seeking professional treatment and appraisal of the consequences of substance use in negatively impacting help-seeking behaviors (Kleinman, Millery, Scimeca, & Polissar, 2002). In addition, union construction workers hold membership in a centuries-old, organizational culture that promotes substance abuse (Sonnenstuhl, 1996). `Union brotherhood' includes gender role indoctrination into a hypermasculine workplace culture that fosters substance use while discouraging treatment (Taillon, 2002). Union members are expected to demonstrate masculine self-reliance in `holding their liquor' and managing their substance use without requiring professional help (Bacharach, Bamberger, & Sonnenstuhl, 1994). Social workers and others in union MAPs need to develop a better understanding of factors that impact members' intention to seek treatment for substance use disorders in order to facilitate treatment entry.This study utilized a cross-sectional survey design to test the relationship between union construction workers' behavioral intention to seek help along three stages of a continuum ranging from ambivalence, to recognition to taking steps, and multiple psychological and environmental predictors. MRA analyses demonstrated that union construction workers' behavioral intention is predicted by their appraisal of negative consequences and adverse effects of their substance use in the workplace, their attitude about masculine self-reliance towards help-seeking, their concern about emotional self-control, and their perception of workplace support of consumption. en_US
dc.format.extent 252 p. en_US
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en_US
dc.publisher The Catholic University of America en_US
dc.subject Social Work en_US
dc.subject Occupational Psychology en_US
dc.subject Organizational Behavior en_US
dc.title The Impact of Perceived Self-Control Over Treatment Access, Appraisal of Consequences of Substance Use, Self-Reliant Attitude Against Help-Seeking and Perception of Workplace Culture on the Behavioral Intention to Seek Treatment for Substance Abuse Among Union Construction Workers en_US
dc.type Text en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US


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