Minor Setback or Major Disaster: The Rise and Demise of Minor Seminaries in the United States, 1958-1983

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Minor Setback or Major Disaster: The Rise and Demise of Minor Seminaries in the United States, 1958-1983

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dc.contributor.advisor White, Joseph M en_US
dc.contributor.author Anello, Robert Lester en_US
dc.contributor.other Tentler, Leslie W en_US
dc.contributor.other Dinges, William D en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-24T17:10:15Z
dc.date.available 2011-06-24T17:10:15Z
dc.date.created 2011 en_US
dc.date.issued 2011-06-24T17:10:15Z
dc.identifier.other Anello_cua_0043A_10235 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1961/9702
dc.description Degree awarded: Ph.D. Church History. The Catholic University of America en_US
dc.description.abstract The sixteenth-century Council of Trent mandated a new training approach for the Catholic priesthood, beginning not before the age of twelve, and in a new type of institution: the "seminary." The ideal that subsequently developed assumed six years of training in a "minor seminary," corresponding to the four high school years and two years of undergraduate liberal arts studies, plus six years of studies at a "major seminary." By the 1950s, U.S. seminarians preparing for the priesthood were plentiful, motivating a construction boom in seminaries. Yet by the 1980s, minor seminary enrollments had declined over eighty percent, and most minor seminaries had either closed or become residence halls affiliated with another Catholic educational institution.This dissertation analyzes the religious values of Catholic parents and their male progeny, the demographic climate which influenced youthful candidates to pursue a vocation as a Catholic priest, and the pedagogical methods used in minor seminaries to train those candidates. It examines five seminaries that closed and three seminaries that survived. Based on that information, it postulates causes for the near-total downfall of the minor seminary from its former prominence as an integral component of Catholic priestly formation. en_US
dc.format.extent 671 p. en_US
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en_US
dc.publisher The Catholic University of America en_US
dc.subject History, Church en_US
dc.subject Religious Education en_US
dc.subject Theology en_US
dc.subject.other Catholic Church en_US
dc.subject.other College Seminary en_US
dc.subject.other High School Seminary en_US
dc.subject.other Minor Seminary en_US
dc.subject.other Priesthood Vocations en_US
dc.subject.other Priestly Formation en_US
dc.title Minor Setback or Major Disaster: The Rise and Demise of Minor Seminaries in the United States, 1958-1983 en_US
dc.type Text en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US


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