Faith, Human Development, and Service Delivery: The Cases of Education and Health in Ghana and Burkina Faso

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Faith, Human Development, and Service Delivery: The Cases of Education and Health in Ghana and Burkina Faso

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dc.contributor.advisor Barbieri, William en_US
dc.contributor.author Wodon, Quentin en_US
dc.contributor.other Dinges, William en_US
dc.contributor.other Jones, Charles en_US
dc.contributor.other Zampelli, Ernest en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2012-06-01T16:44:38Z
dc.date.available 2012-06-01T16:44:38Z
dc.date.created 2012 en_US
dc.date.issued 2012-06-01
dc.identifier.other Wodon_cua_0043A_10332 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1961/10301
dc.description Degree awarded: Ph.D. Religion and Culture. The Catholic University of America en_US
dc.description This dissertation can be viewed by CUA users only.
dc.description.abstract Within the context of the Millennium Development Goals, governments and donors have made improvements in human development in developing countries a key priority. Public sector service providers have a leading role in efforts to improve health and education outcomes, but private providers, including faith-inspired institutions (FIIs), may also contribute. Unfortunately, in-depth empirical assessments of the role that FIIs play in providing health and education services have not been conducted to-date. The purpose of this study is to assess the role that FIIs play in healthcare and education service provision in Ghana and Burkina Faso, with comparisons with other sub-Saharan African countries. The study estimates the market share and reach to the poor of FIIs, their cost for households and their sources of funding, and the satisfaction of their users with the services provided as well as the reasons why individuals and households rely on those services. The study is based mainly on data from national household surveys, but administrative data and information from qualitative fieldwork are also used. The results suggest that the market share of FIIs in the provision of health and education services is lower than commonly believed. Many FIIs do not reach the poor more than public facilities, even if they make efforts to do so, but they do reach the poor more than private secular providers. The cost for households of the services provided by FIIs is often at least as high as that of public providers, but lower than that of private secular providers. When FIIs benefit from external support, they are able to make their services affordable for the poor. The satisfaction of users with the services provided by FIIs is often higher than for public facilities, with respect for users and attention to their needs on the part of the staffs of FIIs playing a key role for higher satisfaction. While faith is not a major factor affecting the choice of healthcare facilities by households, it does influence strongly the choice of schools, especially among Muslim populations. Finally, many of the results are context-specific, highlighting the need for detailed country and local level work in this area. en_US
dc.format.extent 435 p. en_US
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en_US
dc.publisher The Catholic University of America en_US
dc.subject Religion en_US
dc.subject African studies en_US
dc.subject Economics en_US
dc.subject.other Africa en_US
dc.subject.other Education en_US
dc.subject.other Faith en_US
dc.subject.other Faith-based organization en_US
dc.subject.other Health en_US
dc.subject.other Service delivery en_US
dc.title Faith, Human Development, and Service Delivery: The Cases of Education and Health in Ghana and Burkina Faso en_US
dc.type Text en_US
dc.type Dissertation en_US


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